Quotes And Leadership Lessons From The Nightmare Before Christmas

Tim Burton movies are easy to pick out from the rest of the movies you may have seen. They are quirky and dark. They tell stories in a way you will remember them.

His first big screen movie was Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. From there, he directed Beetlejuice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands, and Batman Returns. Then he conceived the cult classic The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Leadership lessons from Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas

The Nightmare Before Christmas is a stop-motion animated film. The dark fantasy musical tells the story of a disenchanted Jack Skellington (Chris Sarandon) as he tries to fill an emptiness in his soul. Throughout his journey to Christmas Town to trying to bring joy to people he doesn’t understand, Jack Skellington fumbles his way back to a realization he didn’t know he wanted.

It’s time for the latest Reel Leadership article. Will you join me on the journey through The Nightmare Before Christmas as we explore the leadership lessons you will find?

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Ocean’s 8

A Reel Leadership Article

There have been many classic heist films in the history of cinema. Heat, The Bank Job, Baby Driver, Ocean’s 11 and 12 (fun little fact, I viewed Ocean’s 12 at my bachelor party oh so many years ago), and Bonnie And Clyde to name a few.

Heist films are all about a team pulling off an impossible job. They rob a bank, steal a bunch of cars, or knock over a casino. You get to experience the thoughts and actions of a team as they go for the score of a lifetime.

Leadership lessons in Ocean's 8

Ocean’s 8 continues in this vein.

Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) is finally released from prison after five years, eight months, and 12 days for her part in a previous Ocean robbery. Upon her release, she begins to implement a scheme she’s been devising for all those years behind bars.

How To Make Leadership Less Lonely

If you ask a leader what his biggest struggle with is in leadership, you will often hear a single answer. Leadership is lonely. I have no one to go to with my leadership struggles.

It’s a fact of life that leadership can be lonely. Leaders can have a hard time finding a true friend whom they can confide and believe in. Especially because most of the leader’s time is spent with others within the organization.

Leadership doesn't have to be lonely. Group of friends hanging out

Photo by Omar Lopez

This isolation makes leadership lonely. Loneliness then makes leadership difficult.

But leadership doesn’t have to be lonely. You can have vibrant relationships from within and without your organization.

How To Make Leadership Less Lonely

We’re going to look at how you can make leadership less lonely. And that’s a good thing.

How To Stop Being Lonely As A Leader

One of the biggest complaints I’ve heard from leaders is that leadership is lonely at the top. It’s a tough job and requires so much from the leader.

Just last year, the Harvard Business Review published an article on leadership loneliness. So, if you’re feeling alone as a leader, don’t despair. You’re not alone.

The friendship of Stormtroopers

Image by JD Hancock

There’s good news. You don’t have to be alone as a leader. There’s plenty of ways to find others of like minds and join forces with them.

It may be through a business venture or some other method, but I know you can find other leaders who need the friendship you so deeply long for.

Here’s my top three suggestions for beating the loneliness of a leader: