Quotes And Leadership Lessons From The Nightmare Before Christmas

Tim Burton movies are easy to pick out from the rest of the movies you may have seen. They are quirky and dark. They tell stories in a way you will remember them.

His first big screen movie was Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. From there, he directed Beetlejuice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands, and Batman Returns. Then he conceived the cult classic The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Leadership lessons from Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas

The Nightmare Before Christmas is a stop-motion animated film. The dark fantasy musical tells the story of a disenchanted Jack Skellington (Chris Sarandon) as he tries to fill an emptiness in his soul. Throughout his journey to Christmas Town to trying to bring joy to people he doesn’t understand, Jack Skellington fumbles his way back to a realization he didn’t know he wanted.

It’s time for the latest Reel Leadership article. Will you join me on the journey through The Nightmare Before Christmas as we explore the leadership lessons you will find?

5 Leadership Lessons From Christmas

What Christmas can teach you about leadership

Is there a more magical time than Christmas? Christmas trees are up in many homes. The houses are decorated with lights and blow up reindeer. Families are coming together and enjoying their time together (I know this last one isn’t always a possibility but it is my hope for you and your family).

what you can learn about leadership from Christmas

Image by Joe Cavazos

Christmas tends to bring out the best in people. They’re excited to share presents with one another and people are often more generous.

But what does this have to do with leadership? Are there leadership lessons from Christmas? You betcha…

Leadership Lessons From Christmas

1. Be joyful:

Christmas, for many, is a happy time of year. People are excited to have their friends and families around. They’re happy to see the looks on their faces when presents are opened.

Leadership Lessons And Quotes From Olaf’s Frozen Adventure

A Reel Leadership Article

Olaf’s Frozen Adventure is a Pixar short shown before the Pixar film Coco (Leadership lessons from Coco). Olaf’s Frozen Adventure takes place in the Frozen universe and sees the return of Elsa (Idina Menzel), Anna (Kristen Bell), Kristoff (Jonathan Groff), and, of course, Olaf (Josh Gad).

The film is set in the kingdom of Arendelle, where Frozen took place. Anna, Elsa, and Olaf planned a surprise dinner for the citizens of Arendelle but things go awry when the villagers leave after the ringing of the Yule Bell and leave the dinner unattended.

Quotes leadership lessons from Olaf's Frozen Adventure

Anna and Elsa then realize they have no Christmas family traditions of their own. Olaf decides to set out to find family traditions Anna and Elsa could adopt as their own.

We watch as Olaf and the reindeer Sven go door to door asking the citizens of Arendelle what their family traditions are.

Supporting Our Servicemen And Veterans During The Holidays With Dan Dwyer

The Answers From Leadership Episode 027

The guest for today’s show is Dan Dwyer. Dan has spent time as an army officer and retired 10 years ago. He’s now helping guide leaders and organizations to achieve transformational results.

We can help support the men and women in our armed forces this holiday and Christmas season

Listen To The Answers From Leadership Podcast

Show Notes:

Dan, can you tell us a little about yourself?

I spent 22 as an army officer. I’m a paternal twin and my twin brother still serves in the navy, he’s in his 32nd year. We were raised by our aunt and uncle.

This month will be 10 years since I took off the uniform.

Most of my focus is on leadership development at coachtoperform.com. That’s really my passion.

We’d discussed on LinkedIn about today’s topic: Leading veterans and servicemen in the workplace…

Yeah, particularly this time of the year, as leaders, we have to be mindful of some of the stressors, typically the holiday season, both at peacetime and especially the last decade plus, it’s been where suicides have increased.

May You Have A Merry Christmas

I’ll be offline most of the day today celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ with family and friends. But I consider you my friends as well.

That’s why I wanted to take a brief minute to write a post to wish you a Merry Christmas.

Christmas is a time to be merry

Remember, today’s not about you or I. Christmas isn’t about the presents under the tree. Christmas isn’t about what we have (or don’t have).

Christmas is about God coming down to earth in the form of a baby.

He came as a man so that he could bear our burdens and wipe away our sins.

As you gather around the Christmas tree or the dinner table, keep your minds and hearts on the reason for this holiday. The birth of a Lord and Savior who didn’t have to come to this world but did so willingly.