Quotes and Leadership Lessons from The Great Train Robbery I

A Reel Leadership Article

The Great Train Robbery is a two-part British television miniseries that was first broadcast in 2013 (Currently available on Amazon Prime, Netflix, and others). It tells the story of the robbery of £2.6 million (£53.5 today) from a Royal Mail train heading from Glasgow to London on 8 August 1963, first from the perspective of the robbers, and then from the perspective of the police. Episode one, A Robber’s Tale, details the organization and successful completion of the robbery. Episode two, A Copper’s Tale, follows the police investigation into the crime and subsequent arrest of many of the perpetrators. It is a fascinating look at two leadership styles, similar in some aspects, very different in others.  In this first article, the leadership style of Bruce Reynolds, the “Robber” will be examined.

Characters from the TV movie The Great Train Robbery

Bruce Reynolds is the leader of a small gang of thieves, a leader who is not satisfied with the £62K ($78K today) robbery at an airport – a robbery that was “supposed to be the big one” £400K  ($507K).  He immediately begins searching for a bigger score.

Leaders Can Have Fun Too

Being Taken Seriously

Woot! Woot! It’s party time. Or is it? Is there ever a time for a leader to let down his guard and have fun with his team?

My answer is a resounding yes. Leaders can (and should) have fun.

Three men jumping off a snow-covered ground

Photo by Zachary Nelson

There’s multiple reasons why leaders should have fun. Some of the reasons are:

  • Having fun as a leader helps you connect with your team. Team members can struggle to feel connected to a leader who doesn’t show a fun side. They will see them as unapproachable and uptight. Break this idea and have some fun.
  • Having fun as a leader helps relieve your stress: Leading is stressful. There are deadlines, people to manage, and people to let go. This is draining on a leader. But, by stepping out of the seriousness bubble, a leader can recover from the trials of leadership.

How To Change How People View You

Being Taken Seriously

If you’re not okay with those you lead failing to take you seriously, you need to change something. It’s most likely not your team. It’s you that needs to change.

We can sabotage ourselves with our actions. We can sabotage ourselves with our words. And we can sabotage ourselves with our appearance.

Man with hand on his chin

Photo by Sharon Garcia

Do you know what the good thing is? We can change these things. Each of the aforementioned ways we sabotage ourselves are a choice.

We choose how to act. We choose how to speak. And we choose how to dress. This means you can change things.

That’s awesome, right? You can begin to work on yourself and you can change the way people view you.

Let’s take a look at the areas you might need to change people’s view of you and be taken seriously.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From The Live Action Lion King

A Reel Leadership Article

I can’t tell you how excited I was to see the new, live-action Lion King movie. The Lion King was a favorite movie of mine and to see it brought to life seemed like a no-brainer.

Oh… how wrong I was.

Mufasa and Simba on a cliff

The latest Disney animated movie to be brought to life didn’t wow and engage like their previous effort, Aladdin. Instead, Pam and I sat bored in the theater watching this trainwreck of a movie.

The new Lion King felt uninspired and thrown together. Nothing truly caught my attention and I was disappointed because of this.

If you do go and watch the live-action Lion King, know you won’t be in for a great movie. You’ll be in for a great movie made into something mediocre.

It’s Okay If People Don’t Take You Seriously

Being Taken Seriously

While we all desire to be taken seriously, especially those of us leading teams, what happens if people don’t take us seriously? Is it a problem to struggle in this area? Will it derail your ability to lead?

These are all great questions. They’re questions that need to be answered.

Woman slouched against a wall

Photo by Eric Ward

Knowing how to be taken seriously will help you become a better, more trusted leader. When you’re not taken seriously, your ability to lead can suffer.

This may sound like I’m condemning the leaders who aren’t taken seriously. The ones whose teams can’t look them in the eye without laughing or smirking.

Maybe that’s you. Maybe it’s another leader you know. Either way, this is troubling.

But don’t fret. It’s okay if people don’t take you seriously. You’re not out of the running as a leader just because people fail to take you seriously. You can still lead… And lead well when you’re not taken seriously.