5 Ways Visualization Can Help You Achieve Your Goals

By now, your New Year’s Resolutions are probably fading fast from memory. You set incredible, challenging goals, but now you’re well past many imaginary goal dates. You feel like a failure.

But you’re not. You’re human. Just like the rest of us out there.

What if I told you that you can get back on track, stay on track, and achieve your goals? I believe you can.

It takes the power of visualization for your goals. That’s what we’re going to discuss in this article.

Man standing on a rock outcropping. Trees surrounding him.

Photo by Ales Krivec on Unsplash

What Is Visualization?

Visualization isn’t difficult. We do it every day; we just don’t realize it.

Think about the time your mind wandered off. You got lost in a daydream. You visualized a reality that wasn’t there.

Now, apply that to your goals. At its core, visualization is a clear mental image of a future event or reality. 

6 Ways To Self-Reflect And Boost Your Leadership

There’s a low din around the office that most leaders are oblivious to. It’s the talk and chatter about how oblivious you, the leader, are to what’s really happening around the office. And in your life.

While this chatter is gossip, there’s gold in it as well. It can help a leader understand where they’re missing it and what they can do to become a better leader.

But…

You probably don’t want to hear the office gossip. You want to be able to change yourself before your team notices. That’s the way a leader does it. They change before their flaws are widely recognized.

The best way to change is to self-reflect regularly. We know how valuable self-reflection is, but we can also struggle with the steps that one can take to do so.

Leaving A Legacy – A Tribute To Dan Miller

One of my long-time online mentors was diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer. The cancer had already spread into his liver and bones. The prognosis was not good.

When I heard the news that Dan Miller is coming close to meeting our Lord and Savior, my heart sank. This man who has poured into thousands, if not millions, of people around the world will soon be leaving us. He’s already shuttered his podcast with a goodbye episode

Man walking up a sandy incline. Sun is setting.

Photo by NEOM on Unsplash

Not only did he inspire me, but he introduced me to wonderful people. From Skip Prichard to Michael Hyatt, his son Kevin Miller, Jerrod Easley of Podcast Movement, Kent Julian to others… He opened my eyes to the possibility around me.

As he’s leaving this mortal plane, he’s still inspiring those who have gotten to know him over the years. He’s not bitter, angry, or frustrated. No, Dan Miller is excited about what this next stage of being brings him.

4 Ways To Balance Leadership Roles And Personal Identity

When I started to blog, I found myself losing myself. I wanted so badly to be successful that I gave up a lot of my identity. I stopped watching television and movies, I changed the way I dressed, and I even left behind hobbies I enjoyed.

What happened here?

I lost my personal identity. I let my role as a leadership blogger supersede my personal identity. And it sucked.

Woman sitting in front of an Apple MacBook laptop

Photo by Mapbox on Unsplash

While I saw success blogging and sharing my leadership insights, I felt adrift. I felt like I was missing something. I was. I was missing myself.

Talking to other leaders, this happens often. New leaders have their own unique style that gets pushed to the background so they can fit in with the current slate of leaders. The same leaders that come and go.

Here’s the crazy part. One thing remains the same: YOU

The Power Of Active Listening In Leadership

There’s an age-old saying that people don’t care what you know until they know how much you care. This quote has been attributed to Theodore Roosevelt. Regardless of whether or not Roosevelt actually said this or not, it’s an important aspect of leadership.

Your people want to know you care. One of the ways you can show this is through listening… active listening. 

Carl Rogers and Richard Farson introduced the idea of active listening in 1957. According to Duke University, active listening is listening with the intent to really understand how the person is feeling and be able to put yourself in their shoes to empathize with them

That’s a lot to take in. 

To be a great active listener, you have to:

  • Listen
  • Have intent
  • Be willing to understand the other person
  • Put yourself in their shoes