Archives For teamwork

After years of being in a leadership position, we can forget what it was like to be on a team with someone over us.

We forget the frustrations we felt when we thought the boss was being unfair. We no longer remember what it was like to be, as some call it, a peon.

Those days are gone. And that can cause trouble.

Are you frustrating your team? -Unsplash

We don’t mean to do this. But it happens.

Being away from “the action” can make us ignorant of what is happening where sales are being made, manual labor is happening, or even in church service.

That’s why I want to warn you of what you might be doing to frustrate your team.

You’re All One Team

January 20, 2016 — 10 Comments

Organizations are often broken down into different departments.

Your church or business may have a technology department, financial department, outreach/marketing department, and more. They’re all vying for the same thing.

To grow the organization.

 

While the goal of each department may be to grow the organization, that goal is frequently hindered by the attitudes held within each department.

It’s not on purpose, but each department may secretly harbor ill-will towards those “other” workers.

They see them as competition, not as team-mates. And we, as leaders, often promote this type of behavior.

How Leaders Destroy Teamwork

The little things leaders do can lead to big-time issues in their businesses. Leaders can begin to break apart the cohesive of a team without even recognizing it.

Leaders destroy teamwork when:

Every Man For Himself?

January 22, 2014 — 15 Comments

Did you notice the title of this post had a question mark at the end of it? The title is asking a question.

Should it be every man for himself in leadership? Should a leader be out for himself? Should the team be out for their own good?

I think you know the answer.

Things get ugly when we're out for ourselves

Image by Pablo Piedra

The answer to the question is of course not. This would reek havoc in an organization.

No one would be concerned how their actions are affecting the bottom line. Or how the company is perceived.

They’d only be worried about their own needs.

Things get ugly when we’re out for our own.

And, yet, how often do we see this type of mindset within companies?

It’s a mindset that’s permeated workplace cultures. And leaders have been guilty of pushing their team members towards it.

What’s the hardest thing to do as a leader? If you’re like me, it’s finding people to buy in and give their all. There’s many times where we place people into positions thinking they’re a good fit. Only to find out they’re not.

Part of the problem is we assign people to tasks. They’re handpicked by us. We want them for the position.

But are they right for the position?

Instead of choosing people to a job position, begin seeking out volunteers for the position.

Now, this doesn’t mean we don’t pay them. This means we’re seeking out people who are looking to expand their influence and take on greater responsibilities.

Why would we want to seek out volunteers instead of appointing someone to a new position?

Something unique happens when we begin adding volunteers to the team. Our teams start to flourish.

The drive to succeed beats within all of us. Some feel the thump of success more than others.

You’re one of those that get into the rhythm and feel the desire. You’re wired for success.

You want to see dreams come true and missions accomplished.

In our pursuit to rise to the top and succeed, we run the risk of arriving at the top alone. It’s one of the reasons many “successful” leaders say leadership is lonely.

They leave a trail of broken relationships in their wake.

A Trail Of Bodies

Have you seen leaders who will do anything to get to where they’re going?

We’ve seen examples of this in other businesses. Enron. WorldComm. And others

Their leadership left a trail of bodies and broken relationships. Though at one point they were considered the top in their fields.