How To Create A Challenging And Enriching Work Environment

A paycheck is one reason people go to work. Other reasons may include the social interaction they get from an office environment or their reason to work could be altruistic. They want to give back.

Two reasons I haven’t mentioned are big reasons people go to work. They want to challenge themselves to do the best work they can. They also want to continue to grow and be enriched.

These two reasons for working are something you can use to create a great environment. One that actually attracts top talent.

By creating a challenging and enriching environment, you will also weed out those people who are only doing it for the paycheck. Bonus! Right?

What Does A Challenging And Enriching Work Environment Look Like?

Before you look to create an environment that is challenging and enriching, you have to figure out what this means. For me, it is quite simple.

4 Steps To Effectively Train Your Team (Infographic)

Creating a training plan for your team members can be scary. You will have to spend hours upon hours going over information with your team. All with the thought your team member might leave before they’re fully trained… Or worse, they will leave once they’re trained and take their new skills with them.

Man getting ready to lift a barbell

Photo by Jonathan Borba

First, let’s kill the negativity. Stop worrying about whether or not your team member will leave. There’s always the possibility a team member will move on.

In all honesty, there’s something scarier than a trained team member leaving. That scarier thing is an untrained team member sticking around.

Know you and your organization will benefit from a trained team member. An untrained team member will only bring your organization down.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From A Quiet Place

A Reel Leadership Article

I missed A Quiet Place in the theaters. After watching it this past weekend, I’m kicking myself for waiting so long to see A Quiet Place.

The movie takes place sometime in the future where the world has been decimated by monsters who have hyper-sensitive hearing. This has forced the world to go into hiding and to remain virtually silent.

The Abbott family in A Quiet Place movie

Emily Blunt, John Krasinski, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe, in A Quiet Place

A Quiet Place tells the story of Lee Abbott (John Krasinski), his wife Evelyn Abbott (Emily Blunt), his daughter Regan (Millicent Simmonds), and son Marcus Abbott (Noah Jupe) as they try to survive in this harsh world.

Through the trials of the Abbott’s, you will jump, cry, and maybe even laugh. More than that, you will find Reel Leadership lessons in A Quiet Place.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Free Solo

A Reel Leadership Article

On June 3rd, 2017, Alex Honnold did the impossible. Alex free-soloed the 3,000 foot El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. Free-soloing is the climbing of a rock-face without the use of any safety equipment. Alex had no harness, no safety net, nothing to catch him if he were to fall.

Such a feat seems nigh-impossible. To climb 3,000 feet into the air without safety equipment makes my mind hurt. It may make yours as well.

Alex Honnold free solo El Capitan

Photo: Free Solo

Having a passion for ice climbing, Free Solo caught my attention because of the high-risk behavior and the excitement of someone doing the impossible. Knowing there are people out there who are willing to risk life and limb to do what no other person is willing to do fascinates me.

How To Train Your Team To Look Forward

A  major roadblock in many organizations is motivating your team to look forward. It’s not because the team isn’t smart. They’re probably a world-class team.

Help your team to look forward

Photo by Anna Utochkina

However, there are issues in motivating them and training your team to look forward. To get them to look forward, we have to look at the root reasons they struggle with this skill.

Why Teams Fail To Look Forward

The reasons teams fail to look forward is plentiful. There are many excuses you’ll hear during your attempts at training forward-thinking in your organization.

  • We’ve never done this before.
  • No one has any experience with launching new projects.
  • We’ve failed before and don’t want to fail again.
  • There’s no time to add something more to our plates.
  • YOU (Yes, you the leader) haven’t allowed us to dream big.