Use Your Weakness

A lot of research has been done in the science of strengths and weaknesses. Most research tells us that we need to stay in our strength zones.

And I’m a strong believer that we see the greatest results when we apply our strengths to what we’re doing.

However, I’ve come to believe that we’re doing a disservice when we dismiss our weaknesses.

Use your weakness to improve

Why Strengths Are Great

Our strengths are the areas in our lives that we rock at. These are things like being a visionary, including others in what you do, or in a desire to achieve goals.

By focusing on these strengths, we’re able to play to our natural talents. We’re able to do what we were created for.

We also feel great when we are working in our strengths.

3 Steps To Be A Courageous Leader

Great leaders will embrace their pain. Great leaders know there will be danger ahead. Great leaders see challenges and run towards them.

Do you know what each of these traits have in common?

They are the epitome of a courageous leader.

What it takes to be a courageous leader

What Is Courage?

Webster’s Dictionary defines courage as:

The ability to do something that you know is difficult or dangerous

Courage means you face the tough trials in life. When there’s pain, you embrace or face it. When there’s danger, you confront it. When you’re challenged, you don’t back down.

These actions are courageous.

They take chutzpah. They take guts. They forge ahead!

How To Become A Courageous Leader

I believe courage is an integral part of a leader. You can’t beat new paths or cast vision without a little bit of courage.

Change is like leaping out of an airplane

Today, I am writing as a contributor to the Christian Writers Blog Chain. The theme for February is “Leap.” If you are a Christian author or writer, be sure to check out Christianwriters.com to network with others.
 
It recently hit me that change is a lot like skydiving. Yeah, skydiving.
 
You are probably asking yourself “Skydiving? What can skydiving teach me about change?”
 
After my first skydive in 2011, I can say it can teach you quite a bit.
 


 
Imagine taking a plane ride. You are in a tiny Cessna airplane. It fits three people comfortably, if you are lucky. This trip, there are five people in the plane. A pilot, two instructors, another person, and yourself.
 
As you take off the plane is loud. Rolling on the runway it is bumpy and rough. You wonder if the plane will be able to lift into the air.
 
It does and you start circling. Up and up you go. The ground below grows further away.
 
Twenty minutes into the flight you are 11,000 feet into the air.
 
The plane is now warm, almost unbearably so. All of a sudden one of the instructors reaches over and opens the door to the plane.
 
Air rushes in, quickly cooling the plane. It creates noise, it sounds like you are in the eye of a hurricane.
 
You and your instructor (who is attached to your back) scoot towards the open door.
 
Now you have a decision to make. Do you leap or do you stay in the plane?
 
I chose to leap. I did not regret it.
 
Whether it be skydiving or change, I think you should take the leap.
 
Here is what I learned from taking that leap