Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Upgrade

A Reel Leadership Article

Set in the near-future, Upgrade is a world of upgrades. Cars are self-driving and self-sustaining. Humans are implanted with technological upgrades. And computers run the home (okay, this one isn’t too far off with the proliferation of automation in the home).

Discover leadership lessons in Upgrade movie

Upgrade tells the sad tale of Grey Trace (Logan Marshall-Green). Early in Upgrade, Grey loses his wife Asha (Melanie Vallejo) after an accident caused by their self-driving car. Grey soon discovers this was no accident and he was played the whole time.

The loss of the love of his life causes the technophobe to accept an implant. The implant would help Grey regain movement and discover who killed his wife. Eventually, leading to an outcome that was unexpected.

Upgrade was a fun romp in a sci-fi setting. Lots of action and intrigue. There’s also plenty of leadership lessons in Upgrade. Let’s check leadership lessons out below.

The Correct Way To Build A Value-Driven Culture Within Your Organization

Values are an important part of any organization. Your values communicate what is important to the organization and what you believe in. Setting clear values will help not only you lead better but your team to do better work.

However, building a value-driven culture is difficult. It’s easy to get caught up in the wrong things when creating values and then communicating those values to the right people.

Values Matter. Show your team why

Image by Evan Rummel

Let’s take a look at 3 steps to build a culture that values values.

The Correct Way To Build A Value-Driven Culture Within Your Organization

1. Use phrases, not singular words:

It’s easy to fall into the trap of using a singular word when trying to communicate the values of your organization. You may want to say “We value respect” or “We value humility.” But what do those phrases really mean?

Leadership Lessons And Quotes From Jackie Chan’s The Foreigner

A Reel Leadership Article

Jackie Chan is inspiring. At 63 years old, Chan will put younger men to shame in the action and stunts he will do in his movies.

The Foreigner (based on the book The Chinaman) is Jackie Chan’s latest U.S. release. It tells the story of Quan Ngoc Minh (Jackie Chan) and his story of revenge.

Quotes and leadership lessons from The Foreigner

After his daughter was killed in a London bombing, Quan goes on a rampage. His desire to find his daughter’s killer and bring him to justice, his justice, cannot be quenched.

In the vein of Liam Neeson’s Taken, Chan is back.

Now, let’s take a look at the leadership lessons from The Foreigner.

 

Caution: The Foreigner spoilers below

Leadership Lessons And Quotes From Jackie Chan’s The Foreigner

1. Being in a rush could cost you:

Quan’s daughter, Fan (Katie Leung), was picked up from school by Quan. She wanted to rush to the dress shop to pick up her dress for a dance.

10 Things I Hate About Leadership

As great as leadership can be, there are frustrating struggles every leader will face. We’ll be hard-pressed to enjoy every minute of leadership.

There’s plenty of times I think of the things I hate about leadership. And then the list begins to take shape…

Sometimes I hate leadership so much I could scream!

Image by Kenny Louie

Leadership comes with it’s own pitfalls. The trappings we all hate. The frustrations of making a tough choice. The terror of stepping forward.

Yet we lead, even with the long lists of things we hate.

1. The added responsibility of leadership: Yup, we all step into leadership and know there’s going to be added responsibility. Sometimes the added responsibility that comes with leadership can be overwhelming.

2. The responsibility to make the hard decisions: Leaders are there for a reason. We’re there to set a course, to plot the way, to make decisions. Not every decision we face will be easy. We’ll have to make some really difficult choices.

What To Do When You Fail To Meet Expectations

It’s going to happen. One day you’re going to let someone down.

This letdown may be your coworkers, your boss, your spouse, your parents, or some other important person in your life. The truth of the matter is you’re going to disappoint them at some point.

We all do it. We might as well be open and honest about this truth. Once we’re honest with ourselves, we can create a plan of action for what we can do when we fail to meet expectations.

Whenever we let someone down, there’s the pang of guilt. We know we didn’t uphold our end of the bargain. The ball was dropped. We were a disappointment.

We’ll often scramble to create an excuse as to why we failed to meet the expectations someone had for us. We’ll throw out excuses. We’ll blame others. We’ll clam up.