Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Spider-Man: Far From Home

A Reel Leadership Article

Tom Holland returns to the fun role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man in Spider-Man: Far From Home. Spider-Man: Far From Home picks up shortly after the recent Avengers: Endgame movie.

Peter Parker is still reeling from the aftermath of Endgame. His friend and mentor, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Junior), is dead. He’s trying to figure out his place in the world he recently returned to. And he has a big legacy to live up to.

Tom Holland as Spider-Man and Jake Gyllenhall as Mysterio in Spider-Man: Far From Home

Not only that, Peter has a love interest, a classmate named MJ (Zendaya). His class is going on an overseas trip (hence the Far From Home subtitle) and he has a big plan. He’s going to ask MJ out.

All of Peter’s plans go in the trash when something crazy happens. A water elemental who looks a lot like Hydro-Man, a Spider-Man villain who controls water, attacks London while Peter and his class are there.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Captain Marvel

A Reel Leadership Article

The last Marvel Cinematic Universe movie to release before this year’s highly anticipated Avengers: Endgame, released this past Friday. Captain Marvel took to the screen and wowed most audiences.

StarringĀ Brie Larson as Carol Danvers/Vers/Captain Marvel as she struggles to remember exactly who she is. We see Captain Marvel’s struggles, disappointments, and triumphs in the latest Marvel film.

Still of Bie Larson as Captain Marvel movie

Brie Larson as Captain Marvel

For many, this was a movie of triumph. Captain Marvel is the first female-led movie in the Marvel movie universe.

Not only was Captain Marvel a step forward for women in the comic book to movie world. Captain Marvel is also a great movie for leaders. There are many Reel Leadership lessons and quotes in Captain Marvel leaders will be able to apply to their work life.

The Correct Way To Build A Value-Driven Culture Within Your Organization

Values are an important part of any organization. Your values communicate what is important to the organization and what you believe in. Setting clear values will help not only you lead better but your team to do better work.

However, building a value-driven culture is difficult. It’s easy to get caught up in the wrong things when creating values and then communicating those values to the right people.

Values Matter. Show your team why

Image by Evan Rummel

Let’s take a look at 3 steps to build a culture that values values.

The Correct Way To Build A Value-Driven Culture Within Your Organization

1. Use phrases, not singular words:

It’s easy to fall into the trap of using a singular word when trying to communicate the values of your organization. You may want to say “We value respect” or “We value humility.” But what do those phrases really mean?

Everyone Has Value

Have you ever played a game of chess? It’s a game of strategy. It’s also a game of value.

Don't discount the value of your team

Each chess piece has value. Each piece has its purpose.

From the Pawn to the King, there’s value to be had.

Everyone Has Value

Much like chess, every member of your team has value.

From the janitor to the salesman to the CEO. Each person brings a unique skill to the table.

Take the janitor for example. He takes pride in keeping the shop floor clean and safe. He also takes out the trash in the office area and makes sure any messes are cleaned up.

This can add tremendous value that we don’t see.

The clean shop floor provides for safe transport of materials. Team members will feel better because there’s a sense of calm with an uncluttered floor.

Why Fair Isn’t Always Fair

Growing up, we all heard that we had to be fair to others. This meant not getting an extra cookie in the lunch line. Or maybe being fair meant that everyone got the same sized treat. Still, fair could also have meant we all had to take turns singing a silly song in class.

We were taught by making everyone have the same treats or the same amount of time on the ball field or taking turns was the fair thing to do.

Knowing what I know now, I have to say I disagree. Much like I disagreed back then.

This fair mindset often seeps into our leadership. After all, it’s been ingrained into our minds that this is true fairness.

Only once everyone has what everyone else has can the world be fair. The playing field is leveled at this point.