5 Tricks To Create A Consistent Writing Habit

It’s my belief that every leader should be writing. Whether it’s writing a blog like this one or writing a book, a leader who writes down his thoughts is able to touch more lives.

But a complaint that I often hear is that there’s no time to write. There’s no way I would be able to squeeze any more into my day.

While I don’t doubt your days are packed, I know you can still find time to create a consistent writing habit.

Create a consistent writing habit

Before you call me out and say that I have more time than you, let me share what my average day looks like:

6:30AM – Wake up, get ready for the office

7:30AM – Leave for the office

8:00AM – Arrive at the office and begin my day

5:00PM – Leave the office and head home

How To Create Consistent Blog Content

Probably the biggest challenge in starting a blog is the process of creating content. Especially on a consistent basis.

Common blogging wisdom tells the blog author that he has to write 3 blog posts a week. Some will even tell the person looking to start a blog that they need to create content 5 days a week.

That’s a lot of content, even at 3 times a week. Blogging this much is also a huge time commitment.

On average, writing a blog post takes me upwards of an hour. Times that by 3 or 5 or 6, depending on the amount of content I produce, and that’s almost a day’s worth of work.

But, with a system, writing consistent blog content can be easier.

Secrets To Becoming More Constistent

There are areas of my life that I’m very consistent in.

I was consistent in being their for our youth group students. I’m consistent in showing up to work. I’m consistent in my writing.

But there are areas in my life where I wish I was more consistent. I know you wish you could be more consistent in certain areas of your life as well.

That’s why I’m excited to share with you the secrets I’ve discovered on how to become more consistent.

Why Consistency Matters

There’s many reasons why consistency is an important trait to practice, especially in leadership.

People need to know that you’re going to do what you say. People want to be able to count on you. People are longing for someone who shows up.

Not only that, consistency can breed good habits for a lifetime.

Inch By Inch We Grow

There’s something frustrating about growing. That frustrating thing?

Growth isn’t instantly noticeable.

There’s truth behind that statement. You know it. You feel it. And, if you’re like me, you resent the fact growth takes time.

You will grow inch by inch

Image by Dave Toaster

Yet it’s a fact of life. Rarely will anything of worth happen instantly. Rather, growth takes time.

Give Growth Time

The world is increasingly becoming an impatient place to be.

We get angry when things take longer than we think they should. The quick meal at Burger King is ruined because it took 5 minutes to get your order rather than 2 minutes. The horns start blaring as the car at the stoplight doesn’t proceed the moment the light turned green. The anger starts rising when your new pet doesn’t catch onto the household rules.

All because we’re impatient. We’re expecting something at the drop of a dime.

The One Identity Of A Leader

It happened again a few weeks ago. A Christian leader I follow on Twitter and whom I respect a lot, tweeted something quite unfriendly that was obviously meant as a direct message. He deleted it about a minute later, but the damage had been done already, at least with me. He wasn’t who I thought he was, because otherwise he would have never written something so ugly.

A man with two different identities

Image by JD Hancock

Having one consistent identity has always been a challenge for leaders. Everyone knows the stories of leaders who were easygoing and loved outside, but a complete nightmare to their families.

With the rise of social media, fining and maintaining that one identity has become even more of a challenge. Authentic leadership requires us to be the same person at home, at work, in the church and online. Including those instances where we think nobody is watching us. But how many of us really have one identity?