Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Robin Hood

A Reel Leadership Article

There’s scant few who don’t know the story of Robin Hood. Robin Hood steals from the rich to give to the poor. Now, moviegoers have another telling of the Robin Hood story.

Set in the distant past, Robin of Loxley (Taron Egerton of Kingsman) is drafted into a war that seems eerily reminiscent of the war in Iraq. Proclaimed to be dead by the Sheriff of Nottingham (Ben Mendelsohn), Robin returns to find Loxley decimated. The Sheriff is taxing citizens to the breaking point. And there’s no one standing up to the evil man.

Robin Hood leadership lessons

There was quite a bit to like in the new Robin Hood movie. The action spurred the movie on. You never felt a dull moment. The characters were decently developed and I felt for Robin as he returned from battle (and death) to discover the love of his life, Marian (Eve Hewson) had moved on and started a relationship with Will Scarlet (Jamie Dornan).

Stop Wringing Your Hands

Jim’s reports are late. Kathy hasn’t done the job she said she was going to do. And Billy can’t seem to operate a computer to save his life.

You’re wringing your hands. You’re worried the organization is going to fall apart.

In reality, you need to stop wringing your hands.

Worrying does nothing for you or your business

What Wringing Your Hands Says

When your team doesn’t get their work done, that’s a scary thing. Their lack of work says they haven’t been productive.

This can even reflect back on you. Some may look at you and say that you’re not doing your job. You’re not leading your team effectively.

At this point, wringing your hands seems like an appropriate response. You’re worried and scared.

That’s exactly what wringing your hands tells those who observe your behavior.

You’re showing an outward sign that things aren’t going right. And you’re nervous.

7 Leadership Lessons Learned From A Recreational Softball League

This year I reluctantly played on a recreational softball league with my coworkers. It’s not something I wanted to do but I joined anyways. I played a few games knowing it would be a great way to connect with my coworkers and get a bit of exercise.

Let me start off by telling you why there was reluctance to join the team. This goes back to my childhood and our local Little League baseball system.

The baseball field was basically in our backyard. I could look over our fence and see the baseball field. The concession stand. The playground equipment. It was a wonderland.

Until I joined the baseball team. Then it became a place of dread.

I’ll be the first to admit. I wasn’t the best ball player. No siree. I pretty much stunk.