Leadership Lessons From Pearl Harbor Day

Tomorrow will mark 78 years since the Japanese army attacked the United States Army at Pearl Harbor. This is a day that lives in infamy.

The attack left thousands dead. 2,403 soldiers, sailors, and civilians were lost. Over 1,000 more were injured.

Grey warship docked at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Photo by Curtis Reese

Pearl Harbor Day is a day to look back. To reflect. And to remember those we lost and the terrible act that caused it.

Looking back on history, we can learn about what happened and how to prevent future attacks. You can also use the reflection of what happened to learn leadership lessons.

Today, I want to look back at what happened on December 7th, 1941. I want to look at it and see what we can learn from this heinous act and how we can become better leaders.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Ready Player One

A Reel Leadership Article

Steven Spielberg brings Ernest Cline’s award-winning novel Ready Player One to the big screen. Any time a director tries to translate a New York Bestseller to film, they face an uphill battle. Fans of the book are looking for a faithful book to movie translation. Moviegoers are looking for a great story. Most of the time, neither group is satisfied.

Quotes And Leadership Lessons From Ready Player One

Having never read Ready Player One, I don’t know how faithful the movie adaptation is to the book. What I do know is that Ready Player One is a darn good movie. Visually, story-wise, and experientially. Moviegoers looking for a fantastic movie will not be disappointed.

What Is Ready Player One?

Ready Player One is the #1 New York Times bestselling book by Ernest Cline. Released in 2012, Ready Player One tells the story of teenager Wade Watts. Wade loves to play a virtual reality game known as OASIS (Ontologically Anthropocentric Sensory Immersive Simulation). Filled with pop culture references, the book was a smash hit.

Stop Wringing Your Hands

Jim’s reports are late. Kathy hasn’t done the job she said she was going to do. And Billy can’t seem to operate a computer to save his life.

You’re wringing your hands. You’re worried the organization is going to fall apart.

In reality, you need to stop wringing your hands.

Worrying does nothing for you or your business

What Wringing Your Hands Says

When your team doesn’t get their work done, that’s a scary thing. Their lack of work says they haven’t been productive.

This can even reflect back on you. Some may look at you and say that you’re not doing your job. You’re not leading your team effectively.

At this point, wringing your hands seems like an appropriate response. You’re worried and scared.

That’s exactly what wringing your hands tells those who observe your behavior.

You’re showing an outward sign that things aren’t going right. And you’re nervous.

Get To Doing

So many people talk. And talk. And talk…

We talk so much we forget there’s action to take.

Why We Talk

We talk because talking feels good. We get to express our desires and what we PLAN to do.

Just the action of speaking out our intentions gives us a sense of premature completion. Talking about what we’re going to do actually gives us the feeling we’ve done it!

Isn’t that crazy?

With that, you can see why we continue to talk about how we’re going to change the world. Or how we’re going to search for a new job. Or lead the organization in a new direction.

Get To Doing

While we should be talking about our goals, we can’t let our action stop at the talking. We’ve got to get to doing.

Here’s How You Gain Respect

“You ain’t going to get my respect until you respect me.”

We can't demand respect

Image by Gigi Ibrahim

You couldn’t count the number of times I’ve heard those words uttered. As a youth leader, the recent generations of students have become centered around the idea of respect.

If you watch them closely, you can see how badly they want respect. Every action they take is centered around gaining respect.

From the clothes they wear to the friends they have to the hobbies they participate in, everything is focused on respect.

Yet they rarely know how to gain respect. The first line of this post is an example of how many young people view respect. It’s the me first and then you attitude.

And it’s completely wrong.

The Wrong Way To Gain Respect

There’s a mindset that you only reciprocate respect after it’s been given to you. People have to show you respect and then you return respect.