5 Relationship Lessons From The Movies

A Reel Leadership Article

You know I’m a huge movie fan. You also know I love to share leadership lessons from the movies in the Reel Leadership series. In those articles, I share leadership lessons from the movies and how they can impact your leadership.

Learn about relationships from the movies

Photo by Ryan Pouncy

Today, I want to shift gears from leadership lessons to relationship lessons from the movies.

Movies are chockfull of relationship lessons. And today we’re going to take a look at 5 movies and the relationship lessons they can teach you.

Relationship Lessons From The Movies

1. Relationships take effort:

Do you remember the Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore film 50 First Dates? In this film, Sandler plays Henry Roth, a man smitten by the stunning Lucy Whitmore (played by Barrymore). The two have an amazing first date… Then Henry learns a crushing truth about Lucy.

5 Ways To Strengthen Relationships

Relationships Matter

As a leader, you know relationships matter. They’re all around you from your family relationships, business relationships, and friendship relationships.

You can’t avoid relationships. But you can do something. You can ignore the important relationships in your life and watch those important relationships slip away.

You have to strengthen your relationships

Photo by Jenn Evelyn-Ann

Knowing you, you don’t want that to happen. You want to strengthen those relationships you cherish.

Let’s take a look at how you can strengthen those relationships today.

5 Ways To Strengthen Relationships

1. Lead with integrity:

Integrity means being honest, upright, doing the right thing. Having integrity as the basis of any relationship, whether that’s business or personal or family, is where you need to start when strengthening relationships.

The firm foundation of integrity does more than give you peace of mind. It gives you boundaries for what you are willing to do in a relationship.

How To Make Leadership Less Lonely

If you ask a leader what his biggest struggle with is in leadership, you will often hear a single answer. Leadership is lonely. I have no one to go to with my leadership struggles.

It’s a fact of life that leadership can be lonely. Leaders can have a hard time finding a true friend whom they can confide and believe in. Especially because most of the leader’s time is spent with others within the organization.

Leadership doesn't have to be lonely. Group of friends hanging out

Photo by Omar Lopez

This isolation makes leadership lonely. Loneliness then makes leadership difficult.

But leadership doesn’t have to be lonely. You can have vibrant relationships from within and without your organization.

How To Make Leadership Less Lonely

We’re going to look at how you can make leadership less lonely. And that’s a good thing.

Managing Personal Relationships In The Workplace

Relationships Matter

While your family relationships may be the most important relationships in your life, your relationships with those you work with almost become equally important. Especially when you consider you may spend more time with your coworkers than you do with your wife or children.

Personal relationships in the workplace matter

Photo by Headway

This fact is daunting. Forty-plus hours a week are spent with people in your office. That’s almost a quarter of your week.

What this means is the relationships at work often become personal relationships on top of the working relationships you have with your coworkers. These people become your friends, confidants, and, sometimes, your significant other.

Don’t tell me these relationships don’t matter. They do. And you have to learn how to manage those personal relationships in the workplace.

Creating Strong Family Relationships

Relationships Matter

If you were to ask someone what their most important relationship is, the answer would most likely revolve around a family member. My relationship with my wife is most important to me. My children are the most important people in my life. Or I love and cherish my parents.

But if you were to ask them how they’re creating strong family relationships, you’ll probably get a blank stare. They know their family relationships are important yet they’re struggling to build strong family ties because of everything else going on in their lives.

Family relationships are vital

Photo by Suzana Sousa

We’ve all seen the results of weak family relationships. Marriages crumble into divorce. Children hating their father or mother. Parents and children no longer on speaking terms. These situations happen even to those who claim their family is important to them.