The Challenges Of A Job Transition

I haven’t had a lot of experience with job transitions. However, the job transitions I’ve had, have exposed me to the challenges you will face when switching jobs.

Man facing first day at new job and the challenges he will face

Photo by Oliver Cole

Most recently, I switched companies and experienced the challenges once more. Today, we’re going to talk about what challenges you’ll face as you transition to a new organization and what you can do about them.

The Excitement Of A Job Transition

Let’s be honest, when you choose to transition from one organization to another, the transition is exciting. You get to move into a new organization and help them thrive. Your expertise will change the company you’re going to.

That is exciting. You have new opportunities. New challenges. New relationships. And, hopefully, better pay.

These items make a job transition fun and exciting. You’re getting to move out and expand your horizons.

Shine Your Light

You’re scared. I get that. I’ve been scared before too. Some days, I still am scared.

I’m scared of the potential within me. And I’m scared I’m not living up to that potential. Worse, I’m scared of what the potential inside of me is capable of.

cacophony of lights. The world needs your light to shine bright

Photo by Gian D

For years I’ve written these blog articles sharing ways you can become a better leader. I’ve shared from my heart and have heard stories of great change. I’ve also received suggestions of things I could do to unleash more of my potential.

What People Want

Readers have suggested I start coaching others. They’ve commented they’d love to hear me speak. Others have said write a book.

They’ve shared what they want out of me. They see potential to grow from what I can share in person or one-on-one. Yet I haven’t taken the steps forward.

Greatness Comes At A Cost

Everyone talks about wanting to be great. They claim they want to make a difference in the world.

But is that the truth? Do people really want to be great?

I don’t believe they do. Greatness comes at a cost. A cost many people aren’t willing to pay.

Greatness will cost you:

Your time

Your energy

Your money

Your effort

Many times people don’t reach the level of greatness within them because they’re unwilling to pay the cost to be great. They want to do the least amount of work for the greatest amount of return.

This doesn’t work in real life. To make progress, to become better, you have to pay the price.

Use Your Setback For Your Comeback

How Your Failure Sets You Up For An Epic Comeback

Setbacks… Something you hate to experience. Something that tells you that you’re not good enough. That you should just go home.

When you experience a setback, you feel like you’re 3 steps further back than when you began. You may think you don’t have what it takes to lead anymore.

Setbacks are great for comebacks

Photo by Aimee Vogelsang

But whenever you experience a setback, don’t think the setback is permanent. Your setbacks are temporary. And they’re a great springboard for your comeback.

The Dreaded Setback

Have you been in a situation where everything is moving forward and going perfectly? You feel like you’re the king of the world (Remember Leonardo DiCaprio in Titanic? We all know what happened to him). Then what happened to DiCarpio’s character happens to you.

You have a setback. The project gets derailed. You have a moral failure. A pink slip is handed to you on Friday afternoon.

You Lose What You Don’t Use

Every year I look forward to ice climbing in February. Every year I remember how much fun I had climbing frozen waterfalls in Munising and the camaraderie of my ice climbing buddies. I also remember how easy ice climbing came to me my first year.

Ice climbing in the upper peninsula of Michigan

Image by Freddy Bahena

Yet when I get back on the ice, the first day or two is horrendous. My ice climbing technique has digressed to a mess and I struggle to reach the top of a fun, yet easy climb called Dryer Hose. I wonder what happened. I question whether or not I had actually climbed well in prior years.

Then on day three or four, something magical happens. I begin to climb like I remembered. The skills I had honed over the years come back like they had never left.

But what happened? Why did I climb poorly the first day or two?