Overcoming Your Resistance To Change

The mere mention of the word change sends shivers up the spines of those who are resistant to change. Do you know who those people are? They’re everyday, normal people like you or me.

Change is a scary word. I hated it for a long time. Change meant things weren’t going to be the same anymore. It meant friends moving away, people dying, job changes, bands breaking up, comic book series ending, new ways of doing business, and so much more.

Two grey wooden barn doors

Photo by Erol Ahmed

Change is a constant in life. We have to get used to change and learn how to overcome our resistance to change. You can’t do this without an intentional outlook on your life.

We’re going to look at ways you and I can fight against our resistance to change. We are going to find ways to become changemakers.

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do

There are times when we struggle to figure out what to do next. How do you put one foot in front of the other when you can’t even take the next step? That’s life sometimes.

We are hit with unexpected life circumstances. Your spouse decides to leave you. A child (or dog) dies. You get laid off.

Confused man sitting on the couch not knowing what to do

Photo by Nik Shuliaahin

These life circumstances make your next decision difficult. How do you continue forward after such a blow?

Life Isn’t Rosy

You’ve been hit by a bad life circumstance. Maybe you’ve experienced one of the ones I’ve already mentioned. Maybe you’ve encountered a life circumstance worse than one of those.

Whatever situation you’re currently in, it might not be so rosy. You may feel like God has abandoned you. Or your friends and family have turned their back on you.

Are You Living In An Echo Chamber?

I recently entered into a conversation on Facebook. Another social media influencer had posted his opinion on the abortion debate that started with Alabama.

The conversation was staying civil. He and his wife were on one side of the fence. I was on the other side.

Starry night background image

Photo by Caleb Steele

For me, that’s okay. I can take disagreement. I can listen to someone who opposes my views and consider their argument. Then something happened.

I logged into Facebook. I checked my notifications. And there were no new notifications from this conversation.

Then I did something I shouldn’t have done. I searched for the Facebook friend. When I couldn’t find his page, I found the URL for his Facebook page and tried to access it. I received the following message:

Message on Facebook stating Sorry, this content isn't available right now The link you followed may have expired, or the page may only be visible to an audience you're not in.

Hmmm… Is Facebook broken? Nope. Something else had happened.

What’s Your Option Number Three?

In June 2019, the alternative rock band Radiohead learned over 18 hours of music recorded during their sessions for their album OK Computer was stolen. The hacker reached out to the band with a ransom demand: Give me $150,000 or I’ll release the stolen recordings.

Black portable recorded records

Photo by Mink Mingle

Radiohead appeared to only have two choices from the hacker. They could either pay the ransom or they could let the hacker release their music for free. The band was stuck between a rock and a hard place…

Until they looked for Option Number Three.

Option Number Three

At first glance, you may agree Radiohead only had two choices. It would be easy to see this as the hacker had only given them two choices. Yet, there was an additional option.

Radiohead blew off the hacker and chose to see a third possible option.

Better Isn’t Always Better

There’s been so many innovative, awe-inspiring inventions in the last couple of decades that it is mindblowing. The Apple iPhone, high-speed internet, DVR… All of these inventions were improvements upon something we already had.

Photo of cool car

Photo by Yuvraj Singh

The iPhone allowed the average phone user to carry a mini-computer inside of their phone. High-speed internet drastically reduced the time it took to browse the internet (or download music). And DVRs allowed television viewers the opportunity to record live TV and watch it at their leisure.

All cool things. All things that improved our lives. Or so we think.

Is it really better to have 200 channels to channel surf through? Can you really find something on Netflix to watch with all of the choices available? What about recording all of the television shows you want to watch (but never get the chance to)?