15 Quotes From Martin Luther King Jr. On Leadership

Martin Luther King Jr. was a man before his time. Because of this, he changed the world. He saw a world in which great injustices were being perpetrated. He couldn’t stand idly by.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister. He was also a social activist. His social activism is what changed the world. He fought for a better future for his children and his children’s children.

Carving of Martin Luther King Jr.

While we haven’t fully achieved his vision of eradicating racism, we have moved closer to this dream. More people today interact with people of different color and ethnicity. It’s amazing to see what this man helped accomplish.

With Martin Luther King Jr. Day happening this coming Monday, I wanted to take time today to share 15 of the most inspiring, uplifting quotes from Martin Luther King Jr. that can be applied to leadership.

What’s Your Trail Look Like?

Pam and I recently traveled to Santa Fe, New Mexico to celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary. It’s hard to believe we’ve been married for 15 years but we have.

Whenever we travel by plane, we rent a vehicle. We’ve thought about trying to do the whole Uber thing while we don’t have our own personal vehicle but it doesn’t make sense to us. The cost to Uber places would outweigh the cost to rent a car and sightsee. Thus, we rent a vehicle.

Red Toyota Rav4 stopped at a crosswalk

Photo by James Coleman

This time around, Hertz put us in a Toyota Rav4. This vehicle was nice. It came with all sorts of features our older, paid-off vehicles do not have. But it did not come with one feature I expected it to have.

Rebuilding Your Organization Looks Like Destruction (But It Isn’t)

I sat in a church service recently where my former youth pastor was honored for 30 years in ministry. That’s a long time to serve in ministry.

Statistics show 50% of pastors will quit ministry within the first 5 years. Only 1 in 10 will retire from ministry. So, let me give Pastor Rick South a huge shout out and congratulations for his years of faithfulness.

Construction vehicle in a field cleared of trees

Photo By Sebastian Grochow

During this service, Pastor Dusty mentioned the state of Abundant Life Church in Wyoming, Michigan, the church Rick is currently pastoring. The church is going through an expansion. This means things are messy.

When you look at any rebuilding project, the process looks like destruction.

Everything is everywhere. Things are scattered about. Pieces are broken or in the wrong place.

An outsider looking in would see pure chaos. Pure destruction.

Become A Better Delegator

We’re so buried in our daily tasks and what’s coming out way, it is easy to feel overwhelmed. Everything is on your shoulders.

But, did you know, you can take some things off of your shoulders? You can allow other people to help you.

People at a table with notepads

Photo by Dylan Gillis

This is called delegation.

And it is magical.

Delegation allows you to ask for help and give your team members something to do. The delegation of tasks also helps you to “effectively” multiple your working hours.

By giving Bill the authority to create weekly meeting reports, you free up one hour of work you can put towards more meaningful work. Now, if you give your assistant Tina the task of managing your calendar, you can free up another hour.

You can effectively gain back lost hours or create hours in your day by the not-so-simple process of delegation.

Leadership Lessons From Pearl Harbor Day

Tomorrow will mark 78 years since the Japanese army attacked the United States Army at Pearl Harbor. This is a day that lives in infamy.

The attack left thousands dead. 2,403 soldiers, sailors, and civilians were lost. Over 1,000 more were injured.

Grey warship docked at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Photo by Curtis Reese

Pearl Harbor Day is a day to look back. To reflect. And to remember those we lost and the terrible act that caused it.

Looking back on history, we can learn about what happened and how to prevent future attacks. You can also use the reflection of what happened to learn leadership lessons.

Today, I want to look back at what happened on December 7th, 1941. I want to look at it and see what we can learn from this heinous act and how we can become better leaders.