Run The Mile You’re In

A Book Review And Application Of Ryan Hall's Book Run The Mile You're In

Playing the comparison game is an easy thing to do. We see other leaders, bloggers, and thought giants running alongside us and we believe we should be where they are.

Looking at what everyone else is doing, we take our eyes off of what we were meant to do. This wrong focus takes us off course. We lose our passion for our vision. And we begin to feel like we’re not doing as much as we should.

American marathon Ryan Hall running in snowy terrain

This is the wrong mindset to have. We cannot compare ourselves to others are doing or have done. We can only focus on the mile we’re in.

Reading Run The Mile You’re In by Ryan Hall, the fastest American half marathoner, opened my eyes to some of the recent struggles I’ve been having. I’ve watched friends of mine go on to start exploding businesses, talk around the world, and have a “larger” impact than I have had and it has gotten on my nerves.

The Coaching Habit 2 Year Anniversary

A little over a year and a half ago I was introduced to Michael Bungay Stanier. Michael is the author of a book everyone should read called The Coaching Habit.

The Coaching Habit was named as the best business book of 2017 by Pat Flynn. And I have to agree.

When you read The Coaching Habit, you will learn the right questions to ask your team. It’ll help you to say less but ask more at the same time.

With the two-year anniversary of the release of The Coaching Habit, I wanted to remind you of the Answers From Leadership Podcast episode featuring Michael and myself discussing The Coaching Habit and how it will impact your leadership.

Check out The Coaching Habit and Michael Bungay Stanier here.

Through Colored Glasses: How Great Leaders Reveal Reality

An Interview With Author Tom Harper

I recently had the pleasure to interview Tom Harper. Tom is the CEO of Networld Media Group and serves as a deacon at Southeast Christian Church. He’s also the publisher of BiblicalLeadership.com and wrote Leading From The Lions’ Den: Leadership Lessons From Every Book Of The Bible.

Interview with Tom Harper author of Through Colored Glasses book cover

Tom recently released Through Colored Glasses: How Great Leaders Reveal Reality. Through Colored Glasses addresses a leadership challenge identified in Proverbs 16:2: All a person’s ways seem pure to them, but motivates are weighed by the Lord. The book is a fable about Leo Perkins, a man who desires to save his company but deep down he’s more worried about bruising his ego.

I was able to ask Tom about Through Colored Glasses, Biblical truth, and how you can become a better leader. Today, I get to share Tom’s thoughts with you and they’re good!

3 Mistakes To Avoid If You Want To Create A Successful Future

Leadership lessons from The Book Of Mistakes

I recently had the pleasure of reading The Book Of Mistakes. Skip Prichard, my friend and a leadership guru himself, penned this fiction book with success principles woven throughout the missive.

The Book Of Mistakes tells the story of a young man named David. David is stressed out and losing hope. Then a chance encounter with a young woman (no, this is not a romance novel) changes the course of David’s life.

Skip Prichard's The Book Of Mistakes

After David’s encounter with this young woman, he discovers a yellow paper she dropped upon their meeting. The note contains the name of a local café and instructions for the woman to meet someone who believes success is only possible if you avoid 9 mistakes.

Thus begins David’s journey into a secret that will live with him forever. It’s possible his journey will live with you forever as well.

5 Thoughts On Sneezing Jesus By Brian Hardin

Sneezing Jesus: How God Redeems Our Humanity

I have to say I was intrigued when I received the book, Sneezing Jesus. The title is intriguing. What could Sneezing Jesus be about?

The book asks the question: Are you ready to be human? This seems counterintuitive. After all, aren’t we all human?

We need to sneeze Jesus

Sneezing Jesus delves into this question and more. And reveals truths that you may not have thought about before.

Within the first few pages of Sneezing Jesus, Hardin had me hooked. He makes the point that Jesus saddled Himself with indigestion and urination and all manner of humanness. Too often, we overlook Jesus’ human-side as we look at His divine side.

But where does this take us? What do Jesus’ indigestion and urination and other bodily functions have to do with being human? More importantly, what does it have to do with us spreading Jesus’ love to others?