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Leadership is a funny thing. We all want to be leaders, and yet so few of us ever achieve that role to any effectiveness. However, the truth is that, while some people are born natural leaders, anyone can develop leadership qualities.

In the business realm, where efficiency and cooperation can mean the difference between success and failure, leadership is especially important. Whether you are an employee or in an official leadership role as a manager, these 7 tips can help you become a more effective leader and role model in your business.

 1. Share Your Vision

Perhaps one of the main things that sets apart good leaders from great leaders is their vision. A great leader doesn’t just tell people what to do, he or she has a vision for the future and helps others catch that vision. Your vision can be anything from creating a more positive work environment, to doubling profits. Large or small scale, no matter what your vision is, having a vision and then sharing it with your coworkers is key to leading others in business.

Have you ever had a sick child or spouse? You wanted to see them made well, to feel better, to be cured.

Now think about a bad leader you’ve been under. Did you want the same for them?

Image by Nils Geylen

Image by Nils Geylen

Probably not. I know I haven’t.

Instead of seeing improved leadership, there have been times I’ve wanted bad leaders gone. Out on the streets and out of a leadership position.

Looking back, I’ve come to realize this isn’t the proper attitude to have.

The Right Attitude To Have With Bad Leadership

Let’s be honest. Bad leadership is difficult to deal with. Team members are frustrated. Resources are stretched. You come to a breaking point.

It’s easy to look at the person who’s leading poorly and want them out.

When you’re chosen or choose to be a leader, you’ll encounter certain roadblocks along the leadership road. We all face them, so fear not. You’re not alone.

Image by Bruce

Image by Bruce

Since you’re not alone, lets start sharing some of our struggles. I’ll start with my list. I’ve come up with a list of 6 leadership struggles every leader will face one day.

  • Unifying the team: With so many different personalities on the team, it can be hard to have team unity. Someone’s always butting heads with another coworker. Learning to unify the team and create a civil working environment is a must.
  • Delegating tasks: There’s the struggle of delegating tasks to team members who may be able to do them better than you. However, when you begin delegating, you show your employees that you have trust in their work. If you want to learn more about delegation, Michael Hyatt has an excellent podcast episode on delegation.

Everyone wants to be effective as a leader. You want to have a team that will accomplish the task set before them. However, many leadership struggle to be effective.

I believe there’s five areas leaders struggle with and which causes ineffective leadership. Most of the times ineffective leadership slowly slips in. Before we know it, we’re wondering why no one is following anymore.

When we discover our leadership is ineffective, you might say our leadership is as useless as a screen door on a submarine (Thanks for the beautiful words Rich Mullins).

What are these reasons you ask? Well, here are my top 5 reasons on why your leadership is ineffective.

The Right Time To Visualize

February 15, 2013 — 13 Comments

Visualizing where we want to end up is a big part of leadership. We’ve got to have an idea of where we’re going.

When we visualize, it’s like painting a picture of the end. It’s beautiful and we know the way we want it to end.

Did you know though that you can visualize the end at the wrong time?

Sunset Vision at Kalalau Trail

Image by Paul Bica

Visualizing At The Wrong Time

There’s a right and a wrong time to visualize. The wrong time can kill your momentum.

You shouldn’t visualize the end victory while you’re in the middle of the work. It can cripple you. Taking away vital energy you need to complete the work.

Meb Keflezighi, an Olympic runner and the 2009 New York Marathon winner, discovered this the hard way. In his book, Run To Overcome, he describes an incident where he visualized his win only to fail miserably.