Archives For success

Do you remember your school days? When you were taught the formula for pi, surface area, or how to calculate volume.

We were taught they were absolute. And they are.

Formulas are so ingrained into our psyche that we look for them everywhere. Even success.

Image by Tom Brown

Image by Tom Brown

I’ve got bad news for you today. There’s no success formula. There’s no way to calculate what’s going to bring success to you and to everyone else.

You won’t be able to find a formula for success.

There’s no easy path to success.

Success will look different for everyone. That’s why we cannot lay down a simple plan or rule that will lead to success.

Instead, there are principles that we can follow that will help, but not guarantee, success.

These success principles include:

This year I reluctantly played on a recreational softball league with my coworkers. It’s not something I wanted to do but I joined anyways. I played a few games knowing it would be a great way to connect with my coworkers and get a bit of exercise.

Let me start off by telling you why there was reluctance to join the team. This goes back to my childhood and our local Little League baseball system.

The baseball field was basically in our backyard. I could look over our fence and see the baseball field. The concession stand. The playground equipment. It was a wonderland.

Until I joined the baseball team. Then it became a place of dread.

I’ll be the first to admit. I wasn’t the best ball player. No siree. I pretty much stunk.

The drive to succeed beats within all of us. Some feel the thump of success more than others.

You’re one of those that get into the rhythm and feel the desire. You’re wired for success.

You want to see dreams come true and missions accomplished.

In our pursuit to rise to the top and succeed, we run the risk of arriving at the top alone. It’s one of the reasons many “successful” leaders say leadership is lonely.

They leave a trail of broken relationships in their wake.

A Trail Of Bodies

Have you seen leaders who will do anything to get to where they’re going?

We’ve seen examples of this in other businesses. Enron. WorldComm. And others

Their leadership left a trail of bodies and broken relationships. Though at one point they were considered the top in their fields.

Your organization is ever changing. New technology. New employees. New techniques.

But getting the buy-in for change can be difficult. I want to give you an easy way to implement change within your organization today.

Image of Change Mural

Image by Nana Agyei

Sometimes changing course in your organization can seem impossible. The ship is already on it’s predetermined path and there’s nothing you can do.

That’s where you’re wrong. You can bring new ideas to the company and it’s easier than you think.

Who You Shouldn’t Start With

Implementing change is all about who you start with. Start with the wrong people and you’ll sabotage your chance at success.

Many times we think we need to start with our top performers. Those A-players who are knocking it out of the park.

This is where we often go astray. The A-players find it much harder to adapt to change. They’ve already got their winning strategies and they like to stick to what works.

We all make mistakes. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t be human.

Sometimes the mistakes bring dire consequences. Others seem less important.

The challenge comes in whether or not your team can recover and make it right.

Houstan Texans and Dallas Cowboys football fumble

Image by AJ Guel

The Fumble

Have you ever watched a football game where the offensive throws a pass and makes the completion only to be hit hard by the defensive squad? During the hit, the receiver loses control of the ball and fumbles it.

Do you know what happens after the hit and fumble? Both teams scramble to recover the ball. The offensive team goes especially hard, knowing a mistake was made. They’re attempting to make it right.

Now It’s About You

Now, what does your team do when a mistake occurs? Do they scramble hard to rectify the situation or do they sit on the sidelines pointing fingers and saying “It’s his fault! He didn’t do his job.”?