Archives For goals

Get To Doing

May 11, 2016 — 3 Comments

So many people talk. And talk. And talk…

We talk so much we forget there’s action to take.

Why We Talk

We talk because talking feels good. We get to express our desires and what we PLAN to do.

Just the action of speaking out our intentions gives us a sense of premature completion. Talking about what we’re going to do actually gives us the feeling we’ve done it!

Isn’t that crazy?

With that, you can see why we continue to talk about how we’re going to change the world. Or how we’re going to search for a new job. Or lead the organization in a new direction.

Get To Doing

While we should be talking about our goals, we can’t let our action stop at the talking. We’ve got to get to doing.

There’s an old saying you’ve probably heard. This idiom has to do with horseshoes and hand grenades:

Close only counts in horseshoes (and hand grenades)

You’ve heard of that expression, right?

Well, I believe we can include leadership, or at least portions of it, in this famous phrase.

Close Is Often Good Enough

Hearing that close enough is good enough from another leader may shock you. Yet, I know it’s true.

As leaders, we want to push for excellence. We want to see people doing the best job they can.

Or do we?

What if the best job someone can do is close enough? Would that be acceptable?

Depending on the project or task, close is good enough.

How can this be? Think about the following situations:

You have a fundraising goal of $2,500. You reach $2,400.

Leadership is full of questions. Especially questions leaders should ask themselves.

These days it seems far too few leaders are asking themselves questions. They’re going with the flow and they’re missing the big picture.

Are you asking yourself questions?

Image by JD Hancock

Why Leaders Should Question Themselves

Leadership isn’t without pitfalls. We can easily find ourselves in compromising situations or making bad decisions.

This happens when we stop asking ourselves vital questions. Questions that look deep into our motives and propel us in the proper direction.

When leaders ask questions of themselves, they’re able to look within. And every leader could use a little more of this introspection.

The Questions Leaders Should Be Asking Themselves

1. Why am I really leading?: Asking ourselves why we lead cuts to the heart of the matter. We begin to see our motives.

They say the biggest fear most people have is the fear of public speaking. I can relate to that fear but I’m not sure public speaking is the biggest fear people really have.

The real fear is not hitting the goals they set.

hitting the goal isn't the point

Image via Joe Jukes

Public speaking is an easy fear to gravitate to. It’s an obvious fear. I mean, who isn’t scared of getting up in front of a crowd of people and sharing their message? I know I’m scared to death to do it.

But it’s not the greatest fear I have. Like many others, I fear failing to meet the goals I set.

The Purpose Of Goal Setting

With the fear of failing to meet goals, many people won’t even set goals. They figure “Why set a goal if I won’t accomplish it?” In theory, this line of thinking seems to make sense.

Where’s Your Focus?

December 12, 2014 — 8 Comments

Many leaders will begin with a clear focus on what’s important. They know the purpose of leadership.

To help others become better. To take others to places they couldn’t have gotten to alone. To show a path.

You can find your focus!

Image by Nina Matthews

Sadly, many leaders will lose there way. They’ll lose their focus. They’ll begin to wonder about what really matters.

At some point or another this happens to almost everyone. After you’ve seen success after success or failure after failure, you can easily lose your focus.

Why We Lose Our Focus

Focus can be a tricky thing to maintain for the long run. During the beginning, it’s easy to stay focused.

You have a targeted goal. You know what you’re aiming for. You have clearly defined metrics of success.

Yet after successes the next milestone becomes muddied. You can’t clearly see what the next step should be.