Archives For failure

Leadership is heavy. The choices leaders make and the actions they have to take are not easy.

For this, leaders need grace.

Showing people the way and helping them reach their potential isn’t easy. It can be maddening at times.

Let’s a took a look at the areas leaders need grace in.

1. Decisions: You knew this was going to be on the list so I got it out of the way right away.

Leaders are tasked with making decisions, many of those decisions are hard. And all decisions have consequences.

Please give us grace when we have to make a tough decision. It’s not easy and weights heavily on us.

2. Action: A leader has to be ready to take action. Whether this is moving forward a church or business in a new direction or letting go of an employee, leaders must move forward.

We know that all leaders are human. They’re frail and they have the ability to fail.

But since they’re in a position of leadership, we overlook the fact that they’re human. And that they can fail.

Leaders will fall, will you help restore?

Image by Dee Ashley

Realize All Leaders Can Fail

I think the biggest thing we can do when a leader fails is to remember that all leaders can fail. Even those you look up to the most.

When you put leadership failure into the perspective that it could easily have been you, you begin to look at the failed leader in a new light.

He’s you but in a different position. The failed leader made bad choices that led him to a place they never thought they’d be.

Each little step away from the truth leads further and further into a rabbit hole that’s hard to get out of.

Our world is flawed. Ever since Adam and Eve took a bite out of that scrumptious apple, our lives changed.

With that fateful bite, mistakes were brought into the world. And everyone will make a mistake.

Your failure impacts many

Image by Eric Vernier

However, as leaders, mistakes can be much more costly to us. The Bible tells us that leaders are held to a higher standard.

When a leader falls, the impact of our mistakes go much further than if they were made by a lay-person.

You never realize how far your failures as a leader will reach until you’ve experienced a failure or a leader you know experiences failure. Walking side-by-side, you see the devastation that is left when leaders make poor choices.

How Far Leadership Failure Reaches

Seeing a leader I greatly respected choose to walk in moral failure has been devastating. Not only for myself but for the many people he’s led and influenced through his life.

While leadership has it’s upsides, there’s also the dark side of leadership. Rarely talked about in public, the frustrating reality of being a leader is often hid. But this needs to change.

We need to publicly acknowledge leadership may not be for everyone. Leadership may hurt more than you thought. Leadership may not even be fun! There are frustrating realities to leadership. Let’s discuss them today.

 

If you’ve been in leadership for any period of time, you know that leadership can be a burden rather than a joy. You may dread going into the office. You may dread going to the church service you lead. Or you might dread waking up and leading your family. You will find yourself frustrated as you lead. There’s no doubt in my mind. Something will happen and frustrations will rise. Frustrating realities of leadership are:

They say the biggest fear most people have is the fear of public speaking. I can relate to that fear but I’m not sure public speaking is the biggest fear people really have.

The real fear is not hitting the goals they set.

hitting the goal isn't the point

Image via Joe Jukes

Public speaking is an easy fear to gravitate to. It’s an obvious fear. I mean, who isn’t scared of getting up in front of a crowd of people and sharing their message? I know I’m scared to death to do it.

But it’s not the greatest fear I have. Like many others, I fear failing to meet the goals I set.

The Purpose Of Goal Setting

With the fear of failing to meet goals, many people won’t even set goals. They figure “Why set a goal if I won’t accomplish it?” In theory, this line of thinking seems to make sense.