Archives For caring

Theodore Roosevelt once said

People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care

Care for others, not like this

The more I’ve led, the more I’ve discovered this truth. When we were leading young students, this especially came into play.

With troubles at home, issues at school, and a general disdain for authority, they struggled with listening to those in a position of power. That is, until you showed them you cared about their life.

So, what can you do to show people you care? I think the following 7 actions demonstrate an attitude of caring towards others.

1. Ask pertinent questions: People love to talk about themselves. So ask questions that relate to their lives and their interests.

By asking questions around their likes and desires, you open up a channel of communication and this shows that you care about them not only as an employee but also as a person.

My mind keeps wandering back to the song Word Up! by Cameo. The lyrics, wave your hands like you just don’t care, are drawing me in as I write this.

I don’t care today. My actions are showing how I feel.

And it’s not pretty.

Who doesn't care?

Image by Mike Baird

While I say this, I’m not sure it’s the truth. Do I really not care? Or is there something deeper, darker going on?

We all have days where we’re trapped in a funk. We feel like we just don’t care. We don’t want to deal with anyone.

You’ve been there, right? I’m not all alone here, am I?

Good, that’s what I thought.

When we’re in the position of “not caring,” we’re in a dangerous position. Our feelings betray us and tell us it’s okay to act out.

It’s often been said people won’t care what you have to say until they know how much you care. While a short quote, this little statement speaks volumes to the power of feeling cared for.

I believe one of the best ways we can show others we care is by talking less.

Is it time to shut your mouth?

Image by David Geohring

But how can this be? Can we really show others we care when we zip our lips?

In a recent Success Magazine article, Adam Sher, CEO of Ryan Seacrest Productions, said this about Ryan:

Ryan listens to what people are saying and has an uncanny ability to understand where they’re coming from and what they really want. In meetings, he spends much more time listening and taking notes than he does talking.

From the same article, Larry King says this about Seacrest:

Every leader will face tragedy at one point or another. It could be the death of a parent or a spouse. Maybe it’s an illness. Who knows what you’ll face but you’ll face it one day.

And since tragedy will strike every leader at one point, the same holds true for your team. Each and every member of your team will have tragedy rear it’s ugly face.

But what do great leaders do when tragedy strikes? That’s the million dollar question.

Kid crying

Image by Binu Kumar

Recently one of our local high school’s marching bands faced a terrible tragedy. Bass drummer Joey Hekkema passed away after battling two rare genetic disorders.

Joey’s immune system was compromised by chronic Neutropenia and hyperIGM. It was a tough battle but he fought it valiantly.

Turning Hecklers Into Fans

October 23, 2013 — 38 Comments

You and I have heard the advice that we should silence the critics. Ignore what the hecklers are saying. Move onto the next great thing we’re going to do.

Recently, I had this mindset rocked.

A great big reminder was dropped into my lap letting me know that the hecklers still matter. They still count. And we can help turn the hecklers into fans.

Image by Jesus Gorriti

Image by Jesus Gorriti

This rocking of my mindset occurred at a little taco joint during a lunch break with co-workers. We’d been seated by our waiter when he mentions that I looked familiar.

He’d looked familiar to me also but I hadn’t had a chance to say anything. It turns out that he was a former student in our youth group that hadn’t been there in ages.

While he wasn’t a bad kid, per say, he wasn’t a model youth group student. In fact, he was a heckler (his own words).