Pull Up A Chair

February 11, 2013 — 23 Comments
Pull Up A Chair | Joseph Lalonde

From time to time we lose that personal connection with our team members. The days get busy. Our schedules don’t allow us to meet regularly. We forget to pull up the chair.

As this happens, our team’s attunement is lost.

What’s Attunement?

Attunement is making your team aware and/or responsive. This means getting your team members on the same page and ready to work together.

When a team is attuned, great things begin to happen. Goals are reached. Relationships are improved. Business starts to grow.

Sounds great, huh?

How To Gain Attunement

Gaining attunement in your organization should be a key goal. With it, people are energized and know what’s going on.

However, gaining attunement is the tricky part. It requires hard work on your part. Then again, what good thing doesn’t require hard work?

The key to gaining attunement is to pull up a chair. This sounds simple but it’s not.

You’ve got to put time and effort into sitting down with team members. You’ve got to clear your schedule and make it a priority.

When you’ve pulled up a chair with a team member, you’ve got to give him the goods. Share with them what’s happening in the organization. Reinforce the vision of the company. Invite him to be a part of the journey.

As you build relationships with each member of the team, something amazing happens.

Team members begin to feel a part of the team. They see the organization’s bigger picture. And they begin to chase after this vision.

This is what we’re striving for as leaders. To bring people into alignment with the goals and visions of the organization we’re working for.

Take time to work on building relationships and getting the team in tune with each other. Choose one or two employees that you could sit down with and discuss the vision with this week. And then next week pull up a chair with another couple employees. Continue this process until it becomes a habit.

Question: How does your current organization get it’s employees attuned with it’s vision? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

 

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  • http://sparkvoice.wordpress.com/ DS

    We typically do this through biweekly meetings in one group, a monthly meeting for a larger group.  In addition to that we have semi-annual meetings for an even larger group.  All of these are an effort to help keep us marching to a similar destination.  Some times it’s really effective, some times it seems out of touch b/c too many projects/goals are in place.

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      Sounds good DS. At least your organization is making an effort to reach out to employees and get their feedback.

      • http://sparkvoice.wordpress.com/ DS

        Absolutely…

  • http://www.danerickson.net/ Dan Erickson

    When I tune a guitar I have to tune each string.  So when we tune a team, we have to pull up a chair with each member.

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      Great analogy Dan. 

  • http://tcavey.blogspot.com/ TCAvey

    Your post reminds me of something going on in my church. We are trying to get in tune. It’s a process, not a quick fix. 

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      Awesome, glad your church has noticed the issue and is trying to correct it.

  • http://jonstolpe.com/ Jon Stolpe

    Company-wide meetings, department meetings, and one-on-one meetings are all used to get our team members on board with the vision.  Next week, I’ll be conducting one-on-one’s with my team members.  Friday, we have a department meeting.  And a couple of months ago, we had a company-wide town hall meeting.

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      That’s great Jon. Has this been effective in getting the team on-board?

      • http://jonstolpe.com/ Jon Stolpe

        It’s getting there, but it takes time, consistency, and hard work.

        • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

          That it does Jon. As long as you guys keep it up, you’ll begin to see the results of all the hard work you’re putting in.

  • http://kimanziconstable.com/ kimanzi constable

    Don’t have a team but maybe I can use this with my launch team? :)

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      You could. Reach out to specific members and encourage them to hop on board with the vision. Pat Flynn’s guest on his most recent podcast does something similar with his affiliate members.

  • http://danblackonleadership.com/ Dan Black

    What a practical and important aspect to leading well. “pulling up a chair” allows you to connect with them on so many levels. Thanks for this great post! 

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      Thanks Dan. 

  • http://www.mondayisgood.com/ Tom Dixon

    My company has made huge strides on this recently – and really engages the entire organization in a way that didn’t happen before. I think it is the result of being clear, consistent, and repetitive in sharing the vision.

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      Wonderful to hear Tom. How has your company shared the vision?

      • http://www.mondayisgood.com/ Tom Dixon

        Offsite meeting in Ft. Lauderdale helped me! Seriously…repetition of the vision over and over has gotten it done.

  • http://www.borntwolead.com/ TJ Trent

    Joe,

    We sync about once a week with the senior leader we support.  It allows us to see the impact our individual efforts will have on the overall mission.  PersonalIy, I take it a step further.  I like to spend five to ten minutes each morning with the team.  During that time I share with them what I need from them, what I will be personally working on, and gather feedback from them regarding their priorities for the day.  

    It is essential to the success of the team!

    • http://www.jmlalonde.com Joe Lalonde

      It’s great that you spend time with your team every morning. I bet it gives them the clarity they need to get through the day and complete the important tasks.

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