We’ve seen Marvel Studios succeed with comic book based movies. Captain America, Thor, The Avengers, Ant-Man… They’ve all been blockbuster movies.

Meanwhile, DC Comics has floundered in creating a cinematic universe that movie-goers will fall in love with. Movie flops such as Superman Returns and the recent Batman Versus Superman left fans wondering if DC could deliver a worthwhile movie experience.

DC Comics has now given us the Suicide Squad…

The Suicide Squad is made up of unwilling villains who have been forced to work with the US government to stop other meta-humans who are on a rampage.

Who compromises the Suicide Squad? We have a rogues gallery of DC villains.

Harley Quinn: The Joker’s love interest and former psychiatrist

El Diablo: A man who can control fire

Deadshot, AKA Floyd Wilson: An assassin who doesn’t miss his target

Every leader struggles with the desire to treat everyone on their team the same. They think it’s only right.

It’s what we’ve been taught growing up. You have to treat everyone the same. It’s only right.

But is that true? Can a leader really treat everyone the same way?

Treat people fairly, not the same

My answer may come as a shock. It’s not traditional wisdom but it’s what I’ve found works.

We can’t treat everyone the same way. It’s not possible.

Instead Of Treating People The Same

We’ve got to get over the notion that we can treat people the same way. We can’t. Life doesn’t work that way.

And, people don’t want to be treated the same way.

Sally doesn’t like public recognition, she prefers a kind note letting her know that she did a fantastic job.

One thing I look for in a leader worth following is whether or not they’re willing to draw a line in the sand for the right reasons.

To the average person, this may seem odd. Why would someone want someone leading them who does this?

Are you drawing lines in the sand?

For me, the answer is easy.

By drawing a line in the sand, this type of leader is telling you what they believe. You know where they stand and what they’ll take.

Why Leaders Must Be Willing To Draw The Line

Leadership is a relationship with people. Leaders interact with people. Leaders push and prod and guide people.

They also have to set boundaries. That’s really what drawing a line is all about.

When a leader draws a line, he’s saying: This is what I believe. This is what I will accept. This is how far we will go.

The first time I heard the name Jason Bourne, I had no clue who he would be. Then I heard he was the main character, played by Matt Damon, in an upcoming movie called The Bourne Identity.

That was in 2002.

Quotes and leadership lessons from Jason Bourne

Image from Universal Studios

The premise behind the movie sounded interesting: A man is picked up by a fishing boat. His body is riddled with bullet holes. He can’t remember who he is.

This is the story of Jason Bourne. It’s also what got me hooked on the main protagonist of Robert Ludlum’s books.

I still remember being drawn into the world of Jason Bourne in the novels. Then the movies.

Now, 14 years later, the newest Bourne movie is released titled simply Jason Bourne.

So, what can a man with limited memory teach us about leadership? Let’s dig into the leadership lessons from Jason Bourne.

Is there a sadder thing than a man who believes he has die-hard friends only to discover those friends really weren’t his friends?

People believe they have great friendships all the time. These so-called friends lap praise upon praise. They’re told they can do no wrong…

What is a true friend?

My question: Is that really a friendship? Or is it a recipe for disaster?

Real Friends Do This

Having people who tell you how great you are, feels good. Real good.

Our egos get a boost. We feel like we’re on cloud 9. We might be.

And real friends do give us compliments and encourage us. They tell us when we’re doing good. When we’re rocking it.

Real friends also do something else.

When we have true-blue friends, they know us well enough to call us out on the carpet.