There’s a lot of confusion today. Very smart people are acting in ways that are ungentlemanly and unwomanly.

The bravado and arrogance shown betray what they know.

Have you met someone like that? I know you have.

Wisdom is better than knowledge

Image by Andy Rennie

This arrogance and bravado show the difference between a knowledgeable man and a wise man.

What A Knowledgeable Man Does

You’ve met a knowledgeable person before. You can begin to tell one the moment you start to speak with them.

Verbose words flow from their mouths. Cockiness exudes from their pores.

Something within you is repulsed when you met this type of person.

The knowledgeable man shows off through his words and what he knows. He makes it plain as day that he KNOWS what he’s talking about. And he’s not afraid to show it.

I sincerely believe leadership goes beyond a title or position. Having one of those only goes so far.

People will follow a titled or positioned leader only so far. Eventually they’ll realize this person is a leader in name only.

This falling away is why you must do more than have a title to be called a leader.

Here’s a few simple things you can do to demonstrate you’re a leader even if you lack the title.

Serve: Great leaders serve. This has been Mark Miller’s philosophy and I buy into it.

Great leaders believe the best way to lead is to help others out. They put the needs of others first and look for places to serve.

Where’s a place you can serve? Why aren’t you?

Demonstrate: A great way to demonstrate leadership is to demonstrate what true leadership looks like.

Church leaders know they must continue to work on their skills to improve their knowledge and to continually seek the face of God. We can fall into ruts where we no longer feel the desire to do the seeking. And then we begin to fall away.

This is why I like to keep a list of handy dandy websites to rejuvenate my faith and getting me going again.

5 Websites Church Leaders Need To Visit

There’s so many websites devoted to church leadership it’s difficult to know where to head to for Christian inspiration and to keep a leader on track.

No worries, faithful reader. I’ve got my list handy and I want to share it with you today.

1. ChurchLeaders.com: ChurchLeaders is an amazing resource for leaders in the church. They provide content for Senior Pastors, Worship Leaders, Youth Leaders, Outreach Leaders, Small Group Leaders, and Children’s Leaders.

We all proclaim that we have certain values in our lives. We tell ourselves and others that our family matters. We tell others that our friends matter. We tell others that our faith matters.

My question is, does your life line up with what you say?

People Say One Thing

I’ve heard so many people say how important their family is to them. They say how they’d go to the ends of the earth because of what they mean.

I’ve heard people claim their friends are invaluable. They say there’s nothing else they’d rather do.

I’ve heard people claim God and faith is important. They couldn’t live without God.

People say one thing and yet do another.

These same people that claim to value these friends and family and faith values then go and do things that are contradictory to what they’ve just said.

There’s a marked difference between the habits of successful people versus the habits of unsuccessful people.

Studies have been carried out by many different researchers over the years and the results have been astounding.

SuccessStory.com recently created an infographic to highlight the differences in habits between successful and unsuccessful people and I wanted to share that with you today.

There are successful habits and unsuccessful habits

Habits Of Successful People

One of the quickest ways to become successful is to follow what successful people do. That’s the great thing about the infographic above. It shows us the daily habits of people who are succeeding.

Those habits of successful people include:

Tracking your progress

Learning from your mistakes

Spending time with the right people

Maintaining the proper balance in life

Writing down your goals and targets

Thinking long term

Complimenting others

Making to-do lists