Everyone Has Value

September 16, 2016 — Leave a comment

Have you ever played a game of chess? It’s a game of strategy. It’s also a game of value.

Don't discount the value of your team

Each chess piece has value. Each piece has its purpose.

From the Pawn to the King, there’s value to be had.

Everyone Has Value

Much like chess, every member of your team has value.

From the janitor to the salesman to the CEO. Each person brings a unique skill to the table.

Take the janitor for example. He takes pride in keeping the shop floor clean and safe. He also takes out the trash in the office area and makes sure any messes are cleaned up.

This can add tremendous value that we don’t see.

The clean shop floor provides for safe transport of materials. Team members will feel better because there’s a sense of calm with an uncluttered floor.

Even the best leaders know that they have to follow someone else. Whether that’s the company CEO, shareholders, the church board of directors, or some other person in leadership, we ALL answer to other leaders.

That’s why I love looking at the leaders I enjoy reading and following. Being able to reflect on the reasons I admire these leaders opens my eyes to the qualities of great leadership.

what qualities do you look for in a leader?

When you find a leader worth following, I suggest you latch onto that person. Their leadership qualities can begin to rub off on you.

Examine their lives. See what makes them special. Then emulate those qualities that make them worth following.

Today, I want to look at the lives of a couple of leaders I believe are worth following.

On January 15th, 2009, the pilot of US Airways Flight 1549 had a choice to make. Do we try to make it back to LaGuardia, land at Teterboro Airport, or make a crash landing in the Hudson River.

Captain Chelsey Sullenberger and First Officer Jeffrey Skiles made unheard of decision to land the plane in the river.

Leadership lessons from Sully

Sully is the story of Captain Sullenberger and the challenges he faced as he was brought before the National Transportation Safety Board to review his processes and what went wrong.

The pilot of Flight 1549 was grilled and vilified by the those on the board. They felt something could have been done differently.

We don’t know if there was anything else that Sully could have done. He only had 208 seconds from the time the birds hit to the time he safely landed the plane on the Hudson River.

Everyone Needs A Team

September 9, 2016 — 4 Comments

Halford E. Luccock once said that no one can whistle a symphony. It takes an orchestra to play it.

How profound. How beautiful are these two sentences.

And how applicable to our lives.

friendships are vital

Life wasn’t mean to be done alone. We were meant to have friends and family and acquaintances surround us.

Much like Halford Luccock’s quote about the orchestra, we can say the same applies to our lives.

Your Life Deserves A Team

When I think back to elementary, middle, and high school, I remember the teams I had. They weren’t people on a sports team.

Rather, my teams were support teams. And I needed them.

In elementary and middle school, some of those people were Nick, Brian, Phillip, and Greg. They were my bros.

We rode bikes together. We hung out after school. We played Nintendo (the original 8-bit system) until the wee-hours of the night.

I’m thrilled to introduce my friend Bob Burg to you in today’s Answers From Leadership podcast. If you haven’t heard of Bob before, you’re in for a treat.


Is there a difference between taking leadership and giving leadership? And, if so, does it really make that big a difference in your ability to lead?

Go Giver leadership is where it's atOur guest says “yes” to both!

Bob is a sought-after speaker at company leadership and sales conferences sharing the platform with everyone from today’s business leaders and broadcast personalities to even a former U.S. President.

Bob is the author of a number of books on sales, marketing, and influence, with total book sales of well over a million copies. He was named by the American Management Association as one of the Top 30 Most Influential Thought Leaders in Business for 2014.