3 Ways A Leader Can Gain Commitment From Their Team

While leadership is about influencing others and helping them to grow, it’s hard to lead when there’s no commitment from those you’re trying to lead. Doing so is like beating a dead horse.

Having committed team members means you’ve created a connection with them. You’ve provided that special sauce that makes them devoted to the mission you’ve laid out before them.

That’s awesome! But what happens when you’re unable to gain commitment from a team member? Things start to go south, real quick.

This is why it’s so important that you get people who are psyched up and ready to go. They want to follow you and make your vision a reality.

But how does a leader gain commitment? I think the following 3 ways will work in most situations.

1. Help people set stretching but achievable goals: We’ all heard the saying that people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. The same goes for gaining the loyalty of your team.

When they know that you’re FOR them, they begin to be FOR you. They’ll work their tail off if you’re willing to help them.

So, help your team grow by encouraging them to set goals that will advance them.

2. Show your vulnerability: Too many leaders feel they have to be the bees knees. They have to have the answers and they have to be in charge, all the time.

This attitude doesn’t attract commitment. Rather, the attitude of knowing it all pushes people away. They can’t relate to you.

Instead, share your faults. Let your team know if you made a mistake, and then follow it up with what’s going to change and how you’re going to work towards making it right.

When we show that we’re vulnerable, we show that we’re just like those we’re leading. Don’t be untouchable. Be approachable.

3. Put others first: Simon Sinek laid out this principle in Leaders Eat Last. This principle has been the foundation within the military for a long time.

The leaders, while tough, stick to the back of the line when it comes time to eat. They know that their team comes before their personal needs.

Loyalty is built upon this principle. Who wouldn’t want to stick by someone who’s willing to put their own needs aside?

Having a team that’s willing to stick with you is huge. You’ve got to work on this and build the foundation of commitment.

When you do, you’ll have a powerful force behind you. They’ll help you move your vision forward like no other.

Question: How have you gained the commitment of those you lead? Let’s talk about this in the comment section below.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Perfect list. I recently rolled out performance review templates to my team, and each of them have stretch (but attainable) goals. I’ll have some that will know they can hit the targets, some that will be unsure, and some that will blame everyone but themselves for not hitting those targets.

    I demonstrate grace to the team, when they have a personal loss or situation that requires them to be away from work for a bit. Those that appreciate that grace tend to rise to the top, not by my actions, but by theirs.

    • That’s awesome Mike. I love how you have a realistic mental image of what your team members will do.

  • Chris Pehura

    Sounds close to what I do. To get someone to do something, you need to do two things.

    1. Don’t ask someone to do something that you wouldn’t do.
    2. If you expect someone to perform for you, you have to put some skin in the game.

    • Leadership by example. I love it!

      • Chris Pehura

        Show. Not tell.